how to use a disk with high reallocated sector count?

Dmitri Chubarov asked:

After 3 years in 24×7 service a 1TB Seagate Barracuda ES.2 enterprise drive is showing signs of failure. S.M.A.R.T. reallocated sector count is high.

Wikipedia article suggests that the drive can still be used for less sensitive purposes like scratch storage outside of an array if remapped sectors are left unused.

A workaround which will preserve drive speed at the expense of capacity 
is to create a disk partition over the region which contains remaps and 
instruct the operating system to not use that partition.

In order to create such a partition it is necessary to fetch the list of remapped sectors. However there are no badblocks visible to the operating system. I.e. badblocks returns an empty list.

Is there a way to recover the list of reallocated sectors?

Edit: This drive is from an array. We get a few of them failing every year and just throwing them away seems to be a waste. I am thinking of giving a second chance to the better parts of the platters.

Here is how the S.M.A.R.T. report looks now.

=== START OF INFORMATION SECTION ===
Model Family:     Seagate Barracuda ES.2
Device Model:     ST31000340NS
Serial Number:    **********
Firmware Version: SN05
...
ID# ATTRIBUTE_NAME          FLAG     VALUE WORST THRESH TYPE      UPDATED  WHEN_FAILED RAW_VALUE
  1 Raw_Read_Error_Rate     0x000f   056   054   044    Pre-fail  Always       -       164293299
  3 Spin_Up_Time            0x0003   099   099   000    Pre-fail  Always       -       0
  4 Start_Stop_Count        0x0032   100   100   020    Old_age   Always       -       14
  5 Reallocated_Sector_Ct   0x0033   005   005   036    Pre-fail  Always   FAILING_NOW 1955
  7 Seek_Error_Rate         0x000f   076   060   030    Pre-fail  Always       -       8677183434
  9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   072   072   000    Old_age   Always       -       24893
 10 Spin_Retry_Count        0x0013   100   100   097    Pre-fail  Always       -       0
 12 Power_Cycle_Count       0x0032   100   037   020    Old_age   Always       -       14
184 End-to-End_Error        0x0032   100   100   099    Old_age   Always       -       0
187 Reported_Uncorrect      0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
188 Command_Timeout         0x0032   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       0
189 High_Fly_Writes         0x003a   097   097   000    Old_age   Always       -       3
190 Airflow_Temperature_Cel 0x0022   050   043   045    Old_age   Always   In_the_past 50 (0 6 50 32)
194 Temperature_Celsius     0x0022   050   057   000    Old_age   Always       -       50 (0 18 0 0)
195 Hardware_ECC_Recovered  0x001a   021   010   000    Old_age   Always       -       164293299
197 Current_Pending_Sector  0x0012   100   100   000    Old_age   Always       -       21
198 Offline_Uncorrectable   0x0010   100   100   000    Old_age   Offline      -       21
199 UDMA_CRC_Error_Count    0x003e   200   200   000    Old_age   Always       -       0

My answer:


If the drive is still under warranty, you can return it to the manufacturer via their RMA process for a free replacement, after sanitizing it first. (Secure Erase will wipe the entire drive, including reallocated or otherwise inaccessible sectors.) (I’m quite surprised nobody suggested this.) Otherwise, you do what @SpacemanSpiff said and buy a new drive.


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